The Fall Feasts

The Fall Feasts

Early in the history of Israel, as Leviticus 23 reveals, God ordained a yearly cycle of “appointed times” to meet with His people in a special way. Each of the Feasts teaches a different aspect of the nature of God and His plan for the world. Through these appointments or mo’adim we see prophetic glimpses of a later redemption that would come through the Messiah during His earthly ministry and upon His return.


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YOM TEURAH
Yom Teurah, or “Day of Teruah,” and also called The Feast of Trumpets, this holy day was instituted in Leviticus 23:24–25, and throughout the history of Israel it was to take place on the first day of the seventh month. Over the course of the history of Israel, the rabbis transformed it into its present status as the start of the New Year based on their belief that this was the exact day when God created the world. Along with Yom Kippur, they are, today, the most important days on the traditional Jewish calendar. Join us on September 20th at 7:00pm for our Yom Teurah service.


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YOM KIPPUR
Yom Kippur means "Day of Atonement" and refers to the annual Jewish observance of fasting, prayer and repentance. Part of the High Holidays, which also includes Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur is considered the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. In three separate passages in the Torah, the Jewish people are told, "the tenth day of the seventh month is the Day of Atonement. It shall be a sacred occasion for you: You shall practice self-denial."(Leviticus 23:27). Fasting is seen as fulfilling this biblical commandment. The Yom Kippur fast also enables us to put aside our physical desires to concentrate on our spiritual needs through prayer, repentance and self-improvement. Join us on September 29th and 30th at 7:00 PM for our Yom Kippur services


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SUKKOT
Sukkot (Feast of Booths or Tabernacles) is one of the three biblically based pilgrimage holidays known as the shalosh regalim. It is an agricultural festival that originally was considered a thanksgiving for the fruit harvest. Sukkot are hut-like structures that the Jews lived in during the 40 years of travel through the wilderness after the exodus from Egypt. As a temporary dwelling, the sukkah also represents the fact that all existence is fragile, and therefore Sukkot is a time to appreciate the shelter of our homes and our bodies. Join us from October 5th-12th. Registration is now open